Subscribe

Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis
[contact-form-7 id="1210" html_class="cf7_custom_style_1"]

Subscribe elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae eleifend ac, enim. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus.

[contact-form-7 id="984" html_class="cf7_custom_style_1"]

Subscribe elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae eleifend ac, enim. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus.

[contact-form-7 id="984" html_class="cf7_custom_style_1"]

Here’s how to watch the Venus-Jupiter conjunction

Every so often two planets appear to cosy up next to each other in the night sky. In reality they are hundreds of millions of kilometres apart, but end up the same part of our night sky almost as if they are touching. Astronomers call this event a conjunction – like conjoined twins.

Click image to see detailed night sky map

Tomorrow morning (13 November) there will be a conjunction between the two brightest planets – Jupiter and Venus. Their unmistakable brightness makes it one of the easier astronomical events to spot. You don’t need binoculars or a telescope. Just look towards the Eastern horizon around 40 minutes before sunrise for two piercingly bright ‘stars’ that are not twinkling. As if that weren’t enough, the Moon and Mars aren’t far away in the sky either. With the weather forecast set fair for much of the UK, make the most of this opportunity to glimpse the solar system in action.

Don’t miss another astronomical event. Sign up for my weekly newsletter to get the latest space news and unmissable spectacles in the night sky.

Email address (required)



 

Leave a comment